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External Slave Cylinder Package installation details!

Brian Estep has been kind enough to document the installation of his GM TKO into a georgeous ‘69 Camaro (see pics of it at the bottom of this page)!  

Brian purchased and installed our Deluxe External Slave Cylinder Package , and this page is a detailed account from Brian as to how the installation went.  He offers some great suggestions for those considering this installation, and most of the wording below is directly from Brian.  He’s also willing to take some email at [email protected].

I am on my second Dodge Viper and I just sold a 1996 LT4 ATI-ProCharged Corvette and this clutch works every bit as good as those hydraulic clutches.  It is a dream!  Wish you could be here to drive it.” -Brian Estep

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Click here for a seperate page with a larger version of all the following pics

Click to see a larger image

Shot of the final position of the Master Cylinder (MC) rod position.  This is critical and will save someone a great deal of time determining where the hole needs to be drilled and positioned.  You will notice it took us several holes to find the optimum position.  We originally had the rod installed low toward the pad.  This caused the throw to be about 1” and rock hard (I mean 50lb hard), but functional. The clutch pedal had to be removed and a hole drilled about 4 inches above where we drilled the first hole. This is very critical.

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Shows another view of the clutch pedal.

Once we got the geometry relationship of the rod position on the clutch pedal to the final resting place of the MC correct, we achieved an original factory adjustable throw (4” or 5”) and most importantly a very light easy pedal effort!   If you have a stiff clutch pedal, it’s not yet right! Keep trying.

 

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Top shot of the MC.  The significant item in this shot is the removal of the top two (one in front / one in back) cast in mounting brackets (it’s hard to describe what you call these things).  These were first cut off with a band saw and then die ground down to make them smooth.  This also shows that it is almost impossible to do this install with a brake booster.  I have the complete awesome Baer Brake system.  Baer engineers have told me the brake booster is not necessary and if you don’t have one they do not recommend you install one.

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Another shot of total MC install.  Note – the remote reservoir is not a necessary piece.   After we relocated the MC it could just be placed on top of the MC.  This is good to let someone see because it is a great option should they need it.

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Another MC shot.

We believe it would be rather difficult to complete this installation with a power brake booster.  However, it seems that you could fabricate and weld to the clutch pedal a bar or arm setup that would relocate the rod and clutch MC to a different position.  This would allow you to work around a power brake booster.

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Shot of firewall plate that must be fabbed.  Note – this is close to the shape of Texas.  Don’t lose sight that it does go up the firewall a bit just like the panhandle in the shape of Texas.  You must look a little hard to see it travel up the firewall just a slight bit.

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Another good shot of the plate.  Put the clutch MC to the right of the brake MC.  There was a plugged factory looking hole in the firewall that we simply elongated toward the brake MC.  The fuse block had to be loosened and pulled back for this to occur.  We also had to take the clutch MC to the band saw and hacked off the top portion in both the front and rear that contained the beefed up eyelets.  We then cleaned it up with the die grinder.

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All pics of the TKO final resting position.  It was something like ” off center of stock.

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Another interior shot showing the shifter location.

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Another interior shot showing the shifter location.

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Just a bottom shot of the bellhousing, slave and clutch fork.  The length of the single hose from the MC to the SC is 36”, but this length will vary depending on the position of the MC.

This is the super easy part.  The SC is already setup by Forte’s Parts Connection.

And of course, a shot of a beautiful ‘69!

GM 502/502

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This website is a comprehensive collection of information regarding the installation of TREMEC transmissions into various vehicles. Material contained in here may be reproduced for PERSONAL USE ONLY. No material may be redistributed in electronic or printed form without the written permission of Brad Wedan (owner). Owner believes to the best of his knowledge this information to be correct, however no warranty is made as to its accuracy. Owner also disclaims any liability for financial loss, property damage or injury in connection with use of this information. Not affiliated with, endorsed or compensated by TTC, or any sanctioning body mentioned within. Any trademarked names are property of their respective trademark holder and are used for identification purposes only. Portions of this website may be copyrighted by other individuals or organizations.

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